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object of bhavanga cita


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#1 haris

haris

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Posted 07 July 2006 - 11:56 PM


Hi Everybody,

I need help to understand the following sentence in ADL. According to my understanding bhavanga cita
does not experience any object.

"
The object of the patisandhi-citta, the bhavanga-citta and the cuti-citta is the same as the object experienced by the javana-cittas which arose shortly before the cuti-citta of the previous life (Abhidhamma in Daily Life, Chapter 15.) "


Thx

Haris

#2 RobertK

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Posted 08 July 2006 - 02:37 AM

Dear Haris,
every citta experiences an object. Thus bhavanga citta too experiences its object as the quote from Abhidhamma in Daily Life says.
Robert

#3 Guest_Scott_*

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 11:24 PM

Jon Abbott writes:

I though it might also be useful to give the description of bhavanga citta from the Abhidhammattha-Sangaha translation and commentary summary prepared by Bhikkhu Bodhi (Ch III)--

QUOTE
"Bhavanga-cittas arise and pass away every moment curing life whenever there is no active cognitive process taking place. When an object impinges on a sense door, the bhavanga is arrested and an active cognitive process ensues for the purpose of cognizing the object. Immediately after the cognitive process is completed, again the bhavanga supervenes and continues until the next cognitive process arises. Arising and perishing at every moment during this passive phase of consciousness, the bhavanga flows on like a stream, without remaining static for two consecutive moments."


In the same passage it discusses the meaning and function of bhavanga--

QUOTE
" The word bhavanga means factor (anga) of existence (bhava), that is, the indispensable condition of existence. Bhavanga is the function of consciousness by which the continuity of the individual is preserved through the duration of any single existence, from conception to death."


Jon