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#1 mina

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 04:25 AM

There are fights between Iraq and America, moreover South Korea prepares a nuclear weapon" Tepodon( I don't know the spelling)". If we can't stop them, the Third World War may break out as soon as it possible, I think. I understand a little Bush wants to retaliate on Iraq, but I want him to know war is the most useless way. In fact, many innocent people died, and the sorrows repeat and repeat...
How do you think about that?

#2 Bhikkhu Pesala

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 07:28 AM

On the night of his Enlightenment, the bodhisatta battled with the armies of Māra.

As Buddhists, that is the way that we should fight evil. There is no evil in the world greater than the evil of ignorance. Whatever evil is in the world “out there” is also found in our own minds ”in here.” The Buddha's way is to fight with the evil ”in here” not with the evil “out there.” Our first duty is to bring about changes in what it is within our own power to change — that is to bring about changes in our own character and self-discipline. With our own “self” well-disciplined it is possible that we might be able to bring about changes in others.

When King Ajātasattu was setting out with his army to attack the Buddha's relatives, the Buddha knew his intention and went to meditate in a place where the king would see him. He sat meditating near a big shady tree, but not underneath it. Instead, he sat out in the open under the hot sun. Seeing him, the king paid respect to him and asked him why he sat under the hot sun instead of under the cool, shady tree. The Buddha remarked, ”While my relatives are alive it is like having a cool shady tree to sit under.” Thinking about what the Buddha had said, the king ordered his army to turn back.

A second and third time, a similar thing happened, but the fourth time the king set out with his army to attack the Sākyans, the Buddha did not intervene. He realised that his relatives had to inherit the results of their previous kamma so there was nothing further that he could do.

This is how we should deal with conflicts in the world. If we can, we should intervene peacefully to prevent bloodshed. In the end, if we can do nothing, we should remain equanimous. All beings are the owners of their kamma and will inherit its results. The Japanese have withdrawn their troops from Iraq. Perhaps they think that there is nothing more to be achieved by remaining there. Either way, if the troops remain the Iraqi people suffer — if the troops leave, the Iraqi people suffer. If Sadaam had remained the Iraqi people would still be suffering. It is a very difficult problem to resolve by any means — either by force or by diplomacy.

A Buddhist's duty is to remove suffering by removing the causes of suffering, which are craving and ignorance. That is our only duty. If everyone followed the Buddha's teaching properly there would not be any wars — not in Iraq, nor in Thailand, Burma, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Nepal, or Tibet. However, even in Buddhist countries we find that people sometimes resort to warfare and violence.

Einstein said a very wise thing, “There are only two things that are infinite — the universe and human stupidity — and I'm not too sure about the former.”

#3 Guest_Guest_*

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Posted 07 July 2006 - 05:19 AM

Thank you very much.

I understand a little.
I understand that ignorance is a big problem and makes a lot of mistakes.

So I want to know about things which happen at this moment correctly from now on.



#4 mina

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Posted 21 July 2006 - 05:17 AM

Thank you very much.

I understand a little.
I think that it is impotant to know the truths.

So I will read newspapers and watch news to know about them.