Jump to content


Photo

Vimuttimagga


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 RobertK

RobertK

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • 1,320 posts

Posted 09 September 2006 - 04:14 PM

From Skilling 171-210, Journal PTS volXX

QUOTE
The position of the Vimuttimagga is closer to that of the Vaibhasikas who include all 4 elements in sprastavyayayatana.

A comparison of the Dhammasangani list with that of the Vimuttimagga shows the important difference that the latter adds 3 items : "rupassa jati, vathu rupa and middha." Although the visuddhma attributes the heresy of middhrup to ..some (ekaccanam matena) the tika tells us that this refers to the abhayagirivasins. Thus the inclusion of both middh-rupa in both the Chinese version and the Tibetan extracts of the Vimuttimagga is evidence that that the Vimutimagga contains classifications that were rejected by the Mahavihara but accepted by the Abhayagiri Skilling concludes that the Vimuttimagga probably came from the Abhayagiri sect. He notes p200 "these are not minor points.

The Mahavamsa notes p267 -268 that the Thera Sanghamitta , who dwelt at the Abhayagiri told the king that the Mahavihara teach a wrong doctrine and so the King made a proclamation telling the populace that they could not feed any monk from the Mahavihara. The good monks thus abandoned it. The Thera then had the King destroy the Mahavihara and "carried away the materials of the buildings hence to the Abhagiri and by means of them many buidings that were borne away from the Mahavihara the Abhayagiri became rich in buildings. Holding fast to his evil friend the Thera Sanghmitta and to his servant Sona the King wrought many a deed of wrong...then by the ruthless Thera Sanghamitta the Abhayagiri-vihara was made stately to see" Earlier p264 it notes that an earlier King helped to purify the sasana by suppression of a heresy he seized bhikkhus dwelling in the Abhayagiri..who had turned to the Vetulya doctrine and were like a throng in the doctrine of the Buddha he excommunciated them." It then notes that the thera sanghamitta (from south India) was embittered against the good bhikkus of the Mahavihara and bided his time until the good king died and the next one Jetthatissa died. Then his time was ripe when the younger brother of Jetthatissa (Mahasena ) came to power.


#2 RobertK

RobertK

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • 1,320 posts

Posted 09 March 2007 - 02:46 PM

Attached File  Pages_from_Vimuttimagga1_16.pdf   3.6MB   72 downloads1-16 Bapat

#3 RobertK

RobertK

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • 1,320 posts

Posted 09 March 2007 - 02:50 PM

Attached File  Pages_from_Vimuttimagga17_33.pdf   6.33MB   47 downloads17-34

#4 RobertK

RobertK

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • 1,320 posts

Posted 09 March 2007 - 02:53 PM

Attached File  Pages_from_Vimuttimagga34_54.pdf   5.77MB   48 downloads34-54

#5 RobertK

RobertK

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • 1,320 posts

Posted 09 March 2007 - 02:57 PM

Attached File  Pages_from_Vimuttimagga55_80.pdf   7.96MB   45 downloads55-80

#6 RobertK

RobertK

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • 1,320 posts

Posted 09 March 2007 - 03:03 PM

Attached File  Pages_from_Vimuttimagga80_100.pdf   6.04MB   39 downloads80-100

#7 RobertK

RobertK

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • 1,320 posts

Posted 09 March 2007 - 03:04 PM

100-117

Attached Files



#8 Guest_Scott_*

Guest_Scott_*
  • Guests

Posted 11 March 2007 - 06:20 PM

Larry provides--- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, LBIDD@...:

Below is a list of "kinds of understanding" from the Vimuttimagga. This is one of Bh. Buddhaghosa's main commentarial sources and the only one to survive. You can see what he used, what he dropped and what he added. Also listed is what I think is possible canonical sources provided by the editor/translators of this edition. These are all given in pali.

1. mundane and supramundane.

2. with/without cankers, Cp. Dhs. 125 para. 584

3. from thought, from study, from culture (bhaavana-maya pa~n~naa), D.III, 219

4. skill in profit, in loss, in means, D. III, 220

5. wisdom that accumulates, does not accumulate, neither accumulates nor does not accumulate, Cp. Vbh. 326

6. produced by one's own kamma, conforms to the truth, connected to the 4 paths, connected to the 4 fruits, Cp. Vbh. 328

7. wisdom of the sensuous element, of the form element, of the formless element, of the unfettered, Vbh. 329

8. of dhamma, of succession, of discrimination, general knowledge, D. III, 226

9. due to combination and not due to non-combination, due to non-combination and not to combination, due to combination and also non-combination, due to neither combination nor non-combination, Vbh. 330

10. due to aversion and not to penetration, due to penetration and not to aversion, due to aversion and also penetration, due to neither penetration nor aversion, Vbh. 330

11. analysis of meaning, of dhamma, of interpretation, of argument, Vbh. 293, 331

12. consequence of cause, cause, analysis of dhamma, knowledge in regard to knowledge (same as 11), Vbh. 293

13. of ill and cessation, of origin of ill and the path, etymological interpretation of the dhamma, analysis of argument (same as 11),Vbh. 293

14. knowledge of the dhamma (namely discourses, mixed verse and prose, expositions etc.), meaning (one knows the meaning of what is spoken), the meaning of what has been preached (analysis of interpretation), knowledge in regard to knowledge (analysis of argument) (same as 11), Vbh. 294

15. "of the dhamma" is in respect of the eye, eye-knowledge in respect of views is called analysis of views, interpreting what has been preached is analysis of interpretation, knowledge in regard to knowledge is analysis of argument (same as 11), Vbh. 296

16. of ill, of the origin of ill, of the ceasing of ill, of the path, D. III, 227

#9 Guest_Scott_*

Guest_Scott_*
  • Guests

Posted 11 March 2007 - 06:23 PM

From, I believe, an earlier iteration of Venerable Dhammanando:
--- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, Robert Eddison <robedd@...>

There's no doubt that Buddhaghosa was acquainted with the Vimuttimagga. However, on the very few occasions he alludes to it, it is only in order to cite and then reject one or another of Upatissa's views. If you have Nyanamoli's translation of the Visuddhimagga you will find one example in the discussion of the cause of the first three of the six character types. See Path of Purification ch. III 80-82 and Nyanamoli's endnote III 19. The latter cites the Paramatthamanjusa (Dhammapala's commentary to the Visuddhimagga), in which the identification of Upatissa and the Vimuttimagga is made explicit.

On the other hand, it is interesting that both Upatissa and Buddhaghosa use the seven purifications as the skeleton of their work. Given that this particular formulation of the path is not especially prominent in the Suttas, I think it is unlikely to be just a coincidence that both authors chose to use it. As far as I'm aware there's no clear evidence of whether this was because B was using U as his source, or both B and U were using some common source, or simply that expounding the path in terms of the seven visuddhi was the done thing at that time. If I had to choose among the three possibilities I would probably go for the third.

#10 Guest_Scott_*

Guest_Scott_*
  • Guests

Posted 11 March 2007 - 06:28 PM

Sarah Abbott,--- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, Sarah <sarahdhhk@...> in reply to the above:

I know very little about this, however Malalasekera in "The Pali Literature of Ceylon" gives quite a lot of detail on this whole issue (pp85-88) and it sounds logical to me, so I'll just parrot some of it.

In brief, after a summary of similarities and differences inc. non- Theravada influences in the Vimuttimagga, he rejects Mr Ngai's conclusion in JPTS 1917-19 that Vism. is a revised edition of Vimuttimagga.

He writes that we can take the Vimuttimagga to be the result of books bought by Guna-bhadra of Mid-India, from his travels to Sri Lanka and elsewhere. In other words, both authors drew their inspiration from the same sources. He suggests there is a lot in common in their detail of Abhidhamma and indeed Buddhaghosa's first book was the ~Naa.noodaya, a treatise on Abhidhamma written before he went to Sri Lanka.

He was sent to S.L. to get the complete collection of commentaries because, to quote Malalasekera, as his teacher tells him: "The Sinhalese Atthakathaa are genuine; the text alone (of the Pi.taka-ttaya) is preserved in this land; the Atthakathaa are not extant. This does not mean that some, at least, of the commentaries were not studied in India, especially in view of the existence of the Sinhalese Saanghaaraama at the Bodhi-ma.n.dapa.[S:??] As long as the text was extant the traditional interpretation thereof, in various degrees of authenticity, at different times, existed as well, handed down through the centuries by a line of teachers who aimed as far as possible at consistency in doctrinal interpretation."

In a footnote in BC Law's book on Buddhaghosa it says that in Mr Ngai's article in JPTS, Upatissa belonged to the first century AD and lived at the time as King Vasabha of Ceylon (AD 66-109). So it seems quite possible to me that he and then Buddhaghosa had access to the same sources of texts and (incomplete) commentaries in India and they were of course both versed in the Abhidhamma. Only after access to the entire set of commentaries in Sri Lanka was Buddhaghosa able to compile the detail and write the Visuddhimagga and other commentaries (and reject some of Upatissa's conclusions in the Vimuttimagga as the reference you give suggests).

If this is correct speculation, then it might be a good example of how even in the first century, reference needed to be made to the full set of ancient commentaries to avoid errors of interpretation of the suttas and Abhidhamma.

Metta,

Sarah
=====

#11 Guest_Scott_*

Guest_Scott_*
  • Guests

Posted 11 March 2007 - 06:32 PM


--- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "robmoult" <rob.moult@...> wrote:


As you know, I have a particular interest in the citta process. In previous posts, I postulated that the details of the citta process were not articulated until the Abhidhimatthasangaha (10th century) since they were not explicitly laid out as a sequence in the Visuddhimagga (5th century).

Lately, I have been reading the Vimuttimagga (The Path of Freedom) and found a wealth of new information. The Vimuttimagga was one of the sources used by Buddhaghosa (in an earlier post, I citied Buddhaghosa's reference to the Vimuttimagga in the area of carita). Sarah, I am not clear at all as to why you consider the Vimuttimagga to be controversial. In his introduction to the Visuddhimagga, Ven. Nanamoli Thera says, "The Vimuttimagga itself contains nothing at all of the Mahayana, its unorthodoxies being well within the 'Hinayana' field".

Here is a quote from Chapter 11 of Vimuttimagga, "The Five Methods" under "Simile of the Thread" and "Simile of the Mango" (p256 in my text).

QUOTE
The Simile of the Thread (possibly taken from DN2 Samanna-phala Sutta)

Here the life-continuum is the consciousness-faculty of becoming. It is likened to the drawing of thread. Adverting is conditioned by the visible object at the eye-door. Through the visible object entering the field (of presentation?), the life-continuum vibrates, and is followed by adverting to the visible object. Adverting which depends on the eye is followed by discerning. This is followed by reception in the sense of experience. Then follows examining in the sense of (investigating) experience. After that becomes determining in the sense of understanding. Determining proceeds and is followed by apperception according to action. Apperception proceeding in the sense of full cognition and not in the sense of means is followed by registration of effect. After that consciousness lapses in the life- continuum.

Simile of the Mango

Q. What is the illustration? A. The king sleeps in his character, having closed the door. A slave-girl massages the king's feet. The queen sits near him. Ministers and courtiers are ranged in front of him. A deaf man is guarding the door with his back against it. At the time the king's gardener, bringing mangoes, knocks at the door. Hearing that's sound, the king awakes, and says to the slave- girl, "Go and open the door". The slave goes to the door-keeper and speaks to him in gesture. That deaf door-keeper understands her wish and opens the door and sees the mangoes. The king takes his sword. The slave brings the fruits and hands them to a minister. The minister presents them to the queen. The queen washes them and sorts the ripe from the raw, places them in a vessel and gives them to the king. Getting them, the king eats the fruits. After eating them, he talks of the merit or non-merit of them. After that he sleeps again.

The sleeping king is the life-continuum. The king's gardener, bringing mangoes and knocking at the door, is the impact of the visible object on the eye-door. The awakening of the king by the knocking at the door, and his command to open the door, illustrate the vibration of the life-continuum. The slave-girl's gestures, in requesting the door-keeper to open the door, is adverting. The opening of the door by the deaf door-keeper and the sight of mangoes illustrate eye-consciousness. The taking of the sword by the king and the handing of the fruits by the slave to the minister illustrate reception. The presentation of the fruits by the minister to the queen is examining. The actions of washing, sorting, placing the fruits in a vessel and offering them to the king illustrate determining. The eating by the king is apperception His talking as to the merits or demerits of the fruits illustrate registration of effect, and his sleeping again is the lapsing into the life-continuum.


Very interesting, eh? The citta process clearly laid out in a text that predates the Visuddhimagga!

It is also interesting that the mango simile used to describe the citta process is different from the mango simile used by Sumangala's commentary to the Abhidhammatthasangaha to describe the same process.

Metta,
Rob M.