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Rembering Things


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#1 haris

haris

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 10:20 PM


Hi Everyone,


Sanna accompanies each citta, but it falls away completely with the citta. How can we still remember things which happened in the past?


Is anyone can help ??


Thx

Harris

#2 Guest_Scott_*

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Posted 05 June 2007 - 04:03 AM

Dear Harris,

Thanks for your question:

H:
QUOTE
"Sanna accompanies each citta, but it falls away completely with the citta. How can we still remember things which happened in the past?"


Dhammasa"ngani (pp. 6-7):

QUOTE
What on that occasion is perception (sa~n~naa)?

The perception, the perceiving, the state of having perceived which on that occasion is born of contact with the appropriate element of representative intellection - this is the perception that there then is.


And from Atthasaalinii (p.146-7):

QUOTE
The noting of an object as blue-green, etc., is perception ['Perception' 'noting' = sa~n~naa, sa~njaananaa]. It has the characteristic of noting and the function of recognising what has been previously noted. There is no such thing as perception in the four planes of existence without the characteristic of noting. Of them, that perceiving which knows by specialised knowledge has the function of recognising what has been noted previously. We may see this procedure when the carpenter recognises a piece of wood which has been marked by his specialised knowledge; when we recognise a man by his secretarial mark on the forehead, which we have noted by our specialised knowledge, and say: 'He is so and so'; or when the king's treasurer, in charge of the royal wardrobe, having had a label bound on each dress and, being asked to bring a certain one, lights the lamp, enters the jewel chamber, reads the label, and brings the dress. According to another method, perception has the characteristic of noting by an act of general inclusion, and the function of [assigning] 'mark reasons' for this inclusive noting, as when woodcutters 'perceive' logs, and so forth.

Its manifestation is inclining [of the attention], as in the case of blind persons who 'see' an elephant. Or, it has briefness as manifestation, like lightning, owing to its inability to penetrate the object.

Its proximate cause is whatever object has appeared, like the perception which arises in young deer mistaking scarecrows for men. Of the perceptions, that which is associated with knowledge follows it, just as, among the elements of extension etc., with their constituents, the remaining constituents follow the elements of extension, etc.


Sincerely,

Scott.