How are wisdom and other wholesome qualities accumulated?

Author
Topic
#550

• N: Rob M answered this very well: ‘This accumulation operates “across
the stream” of cittas through natural decisive support condition
(pakatupanissaya).’

I could add something. The fact that natural decisive support
condition can operate is due to the fact that each citta is succeeded
by a following citta in this long series of cittas that goes on from
life to life.
There was clinging before to all sense objects and clinging falls
away immediately with the citta. However, the tendency to clinging
goes on from citta to citta by way of latent tendency, lying dormant
in the citta.

The latent tendencies are subtle akusala dhammas which are powerful
and lie dormant in the succession of cittas of living beings. They do
not arise but they condition the arising of akusala citta.
Also wholesome inclinations are accumulated.

In the �Saddhammapajjotik��, the Commentary to the C�laniddesa, on
�Pos�la�s Questions� , the meaning of latent tendencies has been
explained as follows:

The word �saya is used for inclination or disposition that lies
dormant and that is a supporting condition for beings. This word
designates beings� accumulation in the succession of cittas of wrong
view or right view, sensuous clinging or renunciation.
The word anusaya is used because the defilements lie dormant and
persist, they lie dormant in the succession of beings� cittas.
Thus aasaya denotes both wholesome and unwholesome dispositions that
are accumulated and anusaaya denotes the latent tendency to certain
akusala dhammas that are accumulated.

——-
Nina.

• truth_aerator

04 Mar, 2011
Hello Rob M, all,

>RM:The implication is that the answer is more of a potential / >accumulation (ayuhana), rather than in a citta which arises and >falls >away. This accumulation operates “across the stream” of cittas >>through natural decisive support condition (pakatupanissaya).

How is “natural decisive support condition” stored/saved/accumulated?
How do mental inclinations, qualities, etc act across time?

For example: How does the quality developed multiple lives before, can act on state of mind in this life?

Thank you for your reply,

With best wishes,

Alex

• truth_aerator

Message 3 of 13 , 04 Mar, 2011
Dear Nina, Rob M, all,

Thank you for your reply.

What, I personally think, is that inclinations are carried from moment to moment and float up when appropriate conditions are met.

With metta,

Alex

upasaka@aol.com

04 Mar, 2011
Hi, Alex –

Dear Nina, Rob M, all,

Thank you for your reply.

What, I personally think, is that inclinations are carried from moment to
moment and float up when appropriate conditions are met.
—————————————–
I tend to disagree. I don’t know what sort of a phenomenon an
“inclination” might be. What I think is that nothing at all is passed along, and
there are no “accumulation entities”. Rather, when an act of will or an
action pursuant to it occurs, i.e., kamma, that kamma, right then and there, is
a conditioning for future actions, i.e., an inclination. The effect occurs
whenever appropriate other conditions hold. Nothing is passed along; it is
action-at-a -temporal-distance. Nothing is accumulated. The initial kamma,
at the very time of its occurrence, conditions the future response, and
repeated occurrences of such kamma simply strengthen the future responses. This
*seems* like an “accumulation”, but nothing is accumulated. If such
action-at-a -temporal-distance seems odd to us, we might think about quantum
mechanics for motivation.
——————————————

With metta,

Alex

===============================
With metta,
Howard

Seamless Interdependence

/A change in anything is a change in everything/

(Anonymous)
truth_aerator

Message 5 of 13 , 04 Mar, 2011
Hello Howard, all,

By inclination I mean, for example: tendency for greed, anger and delusion or the opposites of them.

> Nothing is passed along; it is action-at-a -temporal-distance.

But if only the present exists and not the past, then how can cause from non-existent past affect today?

If cause ceases the next moment, how can it produce effect?

It is like a seed in the soil. If it disappears before growing into a plant, the plant (its effect) will not grow. By inclinations (or potentials) being passed from citta to citta I’ve meant like this example with the seed. As long as there is a seed, it can grow into a plant if certain additional conditions are met. If it disappears, then what can grow into a plant?

With metta,

Alex
• robmoult

Message 6 of 13 , 04 Mar, 2011
Hi Alex, Howard and All,

Natural Decisive Support describes a relationship between dhammas. It is a property. It does not ‘accumulate’, but it can be a strong relationship or a weak relationship.

In the sentence, “A comes before B”, ‘A’ and ‘B’ are things whereas ‘comes before’ is a relationship.

One could say, “A naturally decisively supports B”; ‘A’ and ‘B’ are specific dhammas and ‘naturally decisively supports’ is the relationship between the two dhammas.

So in the case of natural decisive support, what is ‘A’ and what is ‘B’?

The Patthana explains that ‘B’ is the current mental state. ‘B’ are the 89 mental states (cittas) with their associated 52 mental factors. In other words, natural decisive support conditions every single mental state that arises. Why did anger arise? Natural decisive support was a conditioning factor causing anger to arise. Why did generosity arise? Natural decisive support was a conditioning factor causing generosity to arise.

So if ‘the current mental state’ is the conditioned state (natural decisive support being the conditioning agent or the ‘relationship’), what is ‘A’, the conditioning state… the ‘trigger’?

The Patthana explains that ‘A’ can include:
– A past strong mental state (one of 89) and its associated 52 mental factors
– A past strong rupa
– Some past strong concepts

‘Past’ is clearly understood… we are talking about ‘action at a distance’ (BTW, there are only two conditions which operate ‘at a distance’; natural decisive support condition and kamma condition).

What does ‘strong’ mean? I have not found a clear explanation in the commentaries, just brief etymological notes. Personally, I see ‘strong’ as implying one of:
– Recently happened (If I had a bad day, that ‘sours’ my mind)
– Happened repeatedly (With regular meditation, the mind is naturally calm)
– Happened with lots of volition (A vow made by the hermit Sumeda influenced mental states of Bodhisattas for many lifetimes)

When we talk of ‘a habit’, ‘a talent’, ‘a trait’, ‘a tendency’ or ‘personality’, we are talking about the effect of natural decisive support condition. We take precepts (rules of training) to reinforce a commitment to avoid unskillful actions such as killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying and intoxication. Regularly taking precepts makes them a strong conditioning factor to influence future current mental states…. and the conditional relationship between the ‘regular precepets’ (the ‘A’) and ‘future mental states’ (the ‘B’) is called natural decisive support.

Natural decisive support is a hugely important concept. Chapter XVII of the Visudhimagga explains:
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking avijja to sankhara [paragraph 102, 104]
– Natural decisive support is one of the two conditions (together with kamma) linking sankhara to vinnana [paragraph 177 – 181]
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking vinnana to nama-rupa according to the Suttana method [paragraph 201]
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking phassa with vedana, both at the sense door [paragraph 231] and the mind door [paragraph 232]
– Natural decisive support is the *only* condition linking vedana to tanha [paragraph 237 – 238]
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking tanha to upadana
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking upadana to bhava [paragraph 269]
– Natural decisive support is one of the two conditions (together with kamma) linking jati with jara marana, soka-parideva-dukkha-domanassa [paragrah 270]

In other words, the main condition holding the factors of paticcasamuppada together is natural decisive support.

Reflecting on anatta may lead to the thought, “there is no self to control the mind… so how is improvement possible?”. Relecting on natural decisive support leads to the thought, “though the mind cannot be controlled (it is a natural system), the mind can be trained and that is how improvement is possible”.

Groundbreaking research by Richard Davidson showed that the positive effects of mindfulness meditation could be measured, even months after the subject had stopped meditating. This is natural decisive support condition in action!

So let’s push all this theory aside and go out to do wholesome things… it will have an impact on the mind in this life and will also positively impact future lives! That is the teaching of natural decisive support condition… and it has been verified by modern scientific experiments.

Metta,
Rob 🙂

PS: Howard, so nice to chat with you again after so many years!

• robmoult

04 Mar, 2011
Oops

— In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, “robmoult” wrote:
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking tanha to upadana… Visuddhimagga reference is Chapter XVII, paragraph 248
• truth_aerator

Message 8 of 13 , 04 Mar, 2011
Thank you Rob M for your reply.
upasaka@aol.com

Message 9 of 13 , 04 Mar, 2011
Hi, Alex –

In a message dated 3/4/2011 3:49:01 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
truth_aerator@… writes:

Hello Howard, all,
>I tend to disagree. I don’t know what sort of a phenomenon an
>”inclination” might be.

By inclination I mean, for example: tendency for greed, anger and
delusion or the opposites of them.
——————————————————-
No, of course I know that ‘inclination’ and ‘tendency’ are synonyms.
What I don’t know is where it would fit under Buddhist classification. It is
not exactly cetana, is it? And if not, then what is it?
——————————————————-

> Nothing is passed along; it is action-at-a -temporal-distance.

But if only the present exists and not the past, then how can cause from
non-existent past affect today?
——————————————————–
It’s occurrence in the past together with current conditions suffices.
That having been, this will be. We presume from everyday mechanics that
contiguity is required, but it is not.
——————————————————-

If cause ceases the next moment, how can it produce effect?
—————————————————-
By the very fact of its having occurred. No contiguity-connection is
necessary, even though we are accustomed to thinking otherwise.
—————————————————

It is like a seed in the soil. If it disappears before growing into a
plant, the plant (its effect) will not grow.
————————————————–
That is a macroscopic example of contiguous conditionality. But that
is not the only sort of conditionality, even at the macroscopic (aka
“conventional”) level. A Dhammic example of conditionality at a spatial distance
that I think you will readily admit to is rebirth: An old man in Calcutta
dies and is reborn in Chicago. Why should temporal distance seem less likely?
———————————————–

By inclinations (or potentials) being passed from citta to citta I’ve meant
like this example with the seed. As long as there is a seed, it can grow
into a plant if certain additional conditions are met. If it disappears,
then what can grow into a plant?
———————————————–
Nothing grows into something else. One thing was, and another thing
exists later, the latter conditioned by the former.
A possibly clear, macroscopic example is the following: A sage’s
teachings are saved in a cave that is, a century later, buried by a landslide. A
thousand years after that, an excavation unearths the scrolls. A scholar
then studies the teachings and promulgates them. Eleven hundred years passed
between the writing down of the teachings and their promulgation, and
there was no passing along of the teachings during the interim. The writing
down of the teachings then and there served as condition for their
promulgation 1100 tears later. Other events had to occur along the way, of course, in
particular the burying of the scrolls, which prevented weather erosion of
them, and the excavation, which revealed them were among the conditions for
the final promulgating.
The best example of all is what we are discussing: Present kamma at
the very moment of its occurrence serves as condition for future
consequences. Aeons past a murder committed by a person now results in a hellish birth.
Nothing could have been passed along. Inasmuch as there was no point of
creation for a being, one has “existed” for an infinite period of time and
has thus engaged in a literally infinite number of instances of volition. The
doctrine of accumulation must then require that each citta contains a
literally infinite number of “seeds”. This is hardly plausible!
———————————————-

With metta,

Alex

===============================
With metta,
Howard

Seamless Interdependence

/A change in anything is a change in everything/

(Anonymous)

upasaka@aol.com

Message 10 of 13 , 04 Mar, 2011
Hi, Rob (and Alex) –

In a message dated 3/4/2011 4:56:04 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
rob.moult@… writes:

Hi Alex, Howard and All,

Natural Decisive Support describes a relationship between dhammas. It is a
property. It does not ‘accumulate’, but it can be a strong relationship or
a weak relationship.

In the sentence, “A comes before B”, ‘A’ and ‘B’ are things whereas ‘comes
before’ is a relationship.

One could say, “A naturally decisively supports B”; ‘A’ and ‘B’ are
specific dhammas and ‘naturally decisively supports’ is the relationship between
the two dhammas.

So in the case of natural decisive support, what is ‘A’ and what is ‘B’?

The Patthana explains that ‘B’ is the current mental state. ‘B’ are the 89
mental states (cittas) with their associated 52 mental factors. In other
words, natural decisive support conditions every single mental state that
arises. Why did anger arise? Natural decisive support was a conditioning
factor causing anger to arise. Why did generosity arise? Natural decisive
support was a conditioning factor causing generosity to arise.

So if ‘the current mental state’ is the conditioned state (natural
decisive support being the conditioning agent or the ‘relationship’), what is ‘A’,
the conditioning state… the ‘trigger’?

The Patthana explains that ‘A’ can include:
– A past strong mental state (one of 89) and its associated 52 mental
factors
– A past strong rupa
– Some past strong concepts

‘Past’ is clearly understood… we are talking about ‘action at a
distance’ (BTW, there are only two conditions which operate ‘at a distance’;
natural decisive support condition and kamma condition).

What does ‘strong’ mean? I have not found a clear explanation in the
commentaries, just brief etymological notes. Personally, I see ‘strong’ as
implying one of:
– Recently happened (If I had a bad day, that ‘sours’ my mind)
– Happened repeatedly (With regular meditation, the mind is naturally calm)
– Happened with lots of volition (A vow made by the hermit Sumeda
influenced mental states of Bodhisattas for many lifetimes)

When we talk of ‘a habit’, ‘a talent’, ‘a trait’, ‘a tendency’ or
‘personality’, we are talking about the effect of natural decisive support
condition. We take precepts (rules of training) to reinforce a commitment to avoid
unskillful actions such as killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying and
intoxication. Regularly taking precepts makes them a strong conditioning
factor to influence future current mental states…. and the conditional
relationship between the ‘regular precepets’ (the ‘A’) and ‘future mental
states’ (the ‘B’) is called natural decisive support.

Natural decisive support is a hugely important concept. Chapter XVII of
the Visudhimagga explains:
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking avijja to
sankhara [paragraph 102, 104]
– Natural decisive support is one of the two conditions (together with
kamma) linking sankhara to vinnana [paragraph 177 – 181]
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking vinnana to
nama-rupa according to the Suttana method [paragraph 201]
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking phassa with
vedana, both at the sense door [paragraph 231] and the mind door [paragraph
232]
– Natural decisive support is the *only* condition linking vedana to tanha
[paragraph 237 – 238]
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking tanha to
upadana
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking upadana to
bhava [paragraph 269]
– Natural decisive support is one of the two conditions (together with
kamma) linking jati with jara marana, soka-parideva-dukkha-domanassa [paragrah
270]

In other words, the main condition holding the factors of paticcasamuppada
together is natural decisive support.

Reflecting on anatta may lead to the thought, “there is no self to control
the mind… so how is improvement possible?”. Relecting on natural
decisive support leads to the thought, “though the mind cannot be controlled (it
is a natural system), the mind can be trained and that is how improvement is
possible”.

Groundbreaking research by Richard Davidson showed that the positive
effects of mindfulness meditation could be measured, even months after the
subject had stopped meditating. This is natural decisive support condition in
action!

So let’s push all this theory aside and go out to do wholesome things…
it will have an impact on the mind in this life and will also positively
impact future lives! That is the teaching of natural decisive support
condition… and it has been verified by modern scientific experiments.

Metta,
Rob 🙂

PS: Howard, so nice to chat with you again after so many years!
——————————————————
Thank you, Rob!! I feel the same!!! Also, I’m very pleased to have
read what you have written here. It seems to me to confirm my
understanding of this matter, and, in the process, it gives me a good feeling with
regard to Abhidhamma. (You are a good teacher, Rob!! 🙂
==================================
With metta,
Howard

Seamless Interdependence

/A change in anything is a change in everything/

(Anonymous)

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

upasaka@aol.com

Message 11 of 13 , 04 Mar, 2011
Hi, Alex –

I

Hello Howard, all,
>I tend to disagree. I don’t know what sort of a phenomenon an
>”inclination” might be.

By inclination I mean, for example: tendency for greed, anger and
delusion or the opposites of them.
——————————————————-
No, of course I know that ‘inclination’ and ‘tendency’ are synonyms.
What I don’t know is where it would fit under Buddhist classification. It is
not exactly cetana, is it? And if not, then what is it?
——————————————————-

> Nothing is passed along; it is action-at-a -temporal-distance.

But if only the present exists and not the past, then how can cause from
non-existent past affect today?
——————————————————–
It’s occurrence in the past together with current conditions suffices.
That having been, this will be. We presume from everyday mechanics that
contiguity is required, but it is not.
——————————————————-

If cause ceases the next moment, how can it produce effect?
—————————————————-
By the very fact of its having occurred. No contiguity-connection is
necessary, even though we are accustomed to thinking otherwise.
—————————————————

It is like a seed in the soil. If it disappears before growing into a
plant, the plant (its effect) will not grow.
————————————————–
That is a macroscopic example of contiguous conditionality. But that
is not the only sort of conditionality, even at the macroscopic (aka
“conventional”) level. A Dhammic example of conditionality at a spatial distance
that I think you will readily admit to is rebirth: An old man in Calcutta
dies and is reborn in Chicago. Why should temporal distance seem less likely?
———————————————–

By inclinations (or potentials) being passed from citta to citta I’ve meant
like this example with the seed. As long as there is a seed, it can grow
into a plant if certain additional conditions are met. If it disappears,
then what can grow into a plant?
———————————————–
Nothing grows into something else. One thing was, and another thing
exists later, the latter conditioned by the former.
A possibly clear, macroscopic example is the following: A sage’s
teachings are saved in a cave that is, a century later, buried by a landslide. A
thousand years after that, an excavation unearths the scrolls. A scholar
then studies the teachings and promulgates them. Eleven hundred years passed
between the writing down of the teachings and their promulgation, and
there was no passing along of the teachings during the interim. The writing
down of the teachings then and there served as condition for their
promulgation 1100 tears later. Other events had to occur along the way, of course, in
particular the burying of the scrolls, which prevented weather erosion of
them, and the excavation, which revealed them were among the conditions for
the final promulgating.
The best example of all is what we are discussing: Present kamma at
the very moment of its occurrence serves as condition for future
consequences. Aeons past a murder committed by a person now results in a hellish birth.
Nothing could have been passed along. Inasmuch as there was no point of
creation for a being, one has “existed” for an infinite period of time and
has thus engaged in a literally infinite number of instances of volition. The
doctrine of accumulation must then require that each citta contains a
literally infinite number of “seeds”. This is hardly plausible!
———————————————-

With metta,

Alex

===============================
With metta,
Howard

Seamless Interdependence

/A change in anything is a change in everything/

(Anonymous)
upasaka@aol.com

04 Mar, 2011
Hi, Rob (and Alex) –

Hi Alex, Howard and All,

Natural Decisive Support describes a relationship between dhammas. It is a
property. It does not ‘accumulate’, but it can be a strong relationship or
a weak relationship.

In the sentence, “A comes before B”, ‘A’ and ‘B’ are things whereas ‘comes
before’ is a relationship.

One could say, “A naturally decisively supports B”; ‘A’ and ‘B’ are
specific dhammas and ‘naturally decisively supports’ is the relationship between
the two dhammas.

So in the case of natural decisive support, what is ‘A’ and what is ‘B’?

The Patthana explains that ‘B’ is the current mental state. ‘B’ are the 89
mental states (cittas) with their associated 52 mental factors. In other
words, natural decisive support conditions every single mental state that
arises. Why did anger arise? Natural decisive support was a conditioning
factor causing anger to arise. Why did generosity arise? Natural decisive
support was a conditioning factor causing generosity to arise.

So if ‘the current mental state’ is the conditioned state (natural
decisive support being the conditioning agent or the ‘relationship’), what is ‘A’,
the conditioning state… the ‘trigger’?

The Patthana explains that ‘A’ can include:
– A past strong mental state (one of 89) and its associated 52 mental
factors
– A past strong rupa
– Some past strong concepts

‘Past’ is clearly understood… we are talking about ‘action at a
distance’ (BTW, there are only two conditions which operate ‘at a distance’;
natural decisive support condition and kamma condition).

What does ‘strong’ mean? I have not found a clear explanation in the
commentaries, just brief etymological notes. Personally, I see ‘strong’ as
implying one of:
– Recently happened (If I had a bad day, that ‘sours’ my mind)
– Happened repeatedly (With regular meditation, the mind is naturally calm)
– Happened with lots of volition (A vow made by the hermit Sumeda
influenced mental states of Bodhisattas for many lifetimes)

When we talk of ‘a habit’, ‘a talent’, ‘a trait’, ‘a tendency’ or
‘personality’, we are talking about the effect of natural decisive support
condition. We take precepts (rules of training) to reinforce a commitment to avoid
unskillful actions such as killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying and
intoxication. Regularly taking precepts makes them a strong conditioning
factor to influence future current mental states…. and the conditional
relationship between the ‘regular precepets’ (the ‘A’) and ‘future mental
states’ (the ‘B’) is called natural decisive support.

Natural decisive support is a hugely important concept. Chapter XVII of
the Visudhimagga explains:
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking avijja to
sankhara [paragraph 102, 104]
– Natural decisive support is one of the two conditions (together with
kamma) linking sankhara to vinnana [paragraph 177 – 181]
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking vinnana to
nama-rupa according to the Suttana method [paragraph 201]
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking phassa with
vedana, both at the sense door [paragraph 231] and the mind door [paragraph
232]
– Natural decisive support is the *only* condition linking vedana to tanha
[paragraph 237 – 238]
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking tanha to
upadana
– Natural decisive support is one of the conditions linking upadana to
bhava [paragraph 269]
– Natural decisive support is one of the two conditions (together with
kamma) linking jati with jara marana, soka-parideva-dukkha-domanassa [paragrah
270]

In other words, the main condition holding the factors of paticcasamuppada
together is natural decisive support.

Reflecting on anatta may lead to the thought, “there is no self to control
the mind… so how is improvement possible?”. Relecting on natural
decisive support leads to the thought, “though the mind cannot be controlled (it
is a natural system), the mind can be trained and that is how improvement is
possible”.

Groundbreaking research by Richard Davidson showed that the positive
effects of mindfulness meditation could be measured, even months after the
subject had stopped meditating. This is natural decisive support condition in
action!

So let’s push all this theory aside and go out to do wholesome things…
it will have an impact on the mind in this life and will also positively
impact future lives! That is the teaching of natural decisive support
condition… and it has been verified by modern scientific experiments.

Metta,
Rob 🙂

PS: Howard, so nice to chat with you again after so many years!
——————————————————
Thank you, Rob!! I feel the same!!! Also, I’m very pleased to have
read what you have written here. It seems to me to confirm my
understanding of this matter, and, in the process, it gives me a good feeling with
regard to Abhidhamma. (You are a good teacher, Rob!! 🙂
==================================
With metta,
Howard

Seamless Interdependence

/A change in anything is a change in everything/

(Anonymous)

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

• Nina van Gorkom

Message 11 of 13 , 07 Mar, 2011
Dear Rob M,
Op 4-mrt-2011, om 22:55 heeft robmoult het volgende geschreven:
> Natural Decisive Support describes a relationship between dhammas.
> It is a property. It does not ‘accumulate’, but it can be a strong
> relationship or a weak relationship….
Why did anger arise? Natural decisive support was a conditioning
factor causing anger to arise. Why did generosity arise? Natural
decisive support was a conditioning factor causing generosity to arise.
——
N: As you rightly indicate, Natural Decisive Support condition is
very wide, many aspects are contained in it. When kamma produces
result there is not only kamma-condiiton but also Natural Decisive
Support condition, otherwise it could not produce result at a
particular time.

You write: ‘Why did anger arise? Natural decisive support was a
conditioning factor causing anger to arise”. This is very true. The
condition itself does not accumulate, but in this case it operates
because there is accumulation of anger from one citta to the next one
and from life to life. The anger that formerly arose falls away, but
it is carried on in the form of the latent tendency of dosa lying
dormant in each citta. And all the time there are new accumulations
added on. It is not static. New accumulations of kusala and of
akusala occur at the moments of javana. The javana cittas arise and
then fall away and the accumulated tendencies go on from one citta to
the next citta.

Accumulation is a difficult subject. I found the study of the latent
tendencies, anusayas, has helped me to understand that tendencies go
on from one citta to the next citta. I translated a Thai study which
deals with the Yamaka and commentary and other commentaries.

The latent tendencies do not arise, they lie dormant, but, when there
is an opportunity they condition the arising of akusala citta.
The latent tendencies which are akusala dhammas lie dormant also in
kusala citta and avyakata citta (citta that is vipaaka or kiriya).
This shows that they go on from one citta to the next citta. At the
moment of kusala citta they do not condition the arising of akusala
citta, but, they are still dormant. There is no gap. They also go on
to the rebirth-consciousness.
I quote as follows, and note the expression : ‘persist in the
succession of cittas’:

“The sources which give the reason for this conclusion: In the
commentary to the Anusaya Yamaka, in the section on the �Spheres of
Existence� (dh�tu v�ra) we read: �As to the words, how many latent
tendencies lie dormant, this means how many latent tendencies having
persisted in the succession of cittas lie dormant. As to the words,
how many latent tendencies do not lie dormant, this means, how many
latent tendencies do not persist in the succession of cittas and do
not lie dormant? One should distinguish between how many latent
tendencies lie dormant and how many latent tendencies do not lie
dormant.
It has been said with regard to the ordinary people (putthujjana, non
ariyan) that seven latent tendencies are lying dormant. ”

Also the commentary to the �Visuddhimagga�, the tika which is the
�paramattha ma~njusaa�, explains about the latent tendencies as
akusala dhammas that do not arise but that are lying dormant and
follow the continuous succession of cittas. It explains that when
there is an appropriate condition they cause the arising of akusala
citta. We read:

�The dhammas that are called latent tendencies are lying dormant;
they follow the continuous succession of cittas and they cannot yet
be eradicated. It is explained that when they come upon an
appropriate condition they arise. It is true that the defilements
that cannot be eradicated yet must arise when there is a cause for
this, they are as it were dormant in the continuous succession of
cittas.”
——-
Nina.

——-
Kevin

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