the practice of silence

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The Buddha made a vinaya rule against the practice of silence (muugabbata)
as follows:

“Monks, an observance of members of other sects, the practice of silence,
should not be observed. Whoever observes it, there is an offence of
wrong-doing.” — The Book of the Discipline, Part 4, p. 211 trs. I.B.
Horner. It also comes with a story of several pages long leading up to the
Buddha making this rule. It involved several monks deciding to observe
silence together during a rains-retreat (it’s at the beginning of the
Pavaara.naakkhandhaka, Mahaavagga).

Best
It isn’t from the Patimokkha. It’s from the 4th khandhaka of the Mahaavagga
(Vinayapi.taka). The original Pali passage is:

“na bhikkhave muugabbata.m titthiyasamaadaana.m samaadiyitabba.m. yo
samaadiyeyya, aapatti dukka.tassa.” (Vin i 159 pts).

The Mahavagga and the Cullavagga contain a vast number of dukka.ta offences
Dear Cybele,

>>The Buddha made a vinaya rule against the practice of silence (muugabbata)
>>as follows:
>>
>>”Monks, an observance of members of other sects, the practice of silence,
>>should not be observed. Whoever observes it, there is an offence of
>>wrong-doing.” — The Book of the Discipline, Part 4, p. 211 trs.
>>I.B.Horner. It also comes with a story of several pages long leading up to
>>the Buddha making this rule. It involved several monks deciding to observe
>>silence together during a rains-retreat (it’s at the beginning of the
>>Pavaara.naakkhandhaka, Mahaavagga).
>
>
>http://groups.yahoo….ons/topics/6572

Here’s a condensed version of quotes from pp. 208-11, The Book of the
Discipline, Part IV. (trs. I.B. Horner):

[While the Lord was staying near Savatthi,] “several monks, friends, and
associates, entered on the rains in a certain residence in the Kosala
country. Then it occurred to these monks: ‘Now by what means can we, all
together, on friendly terms and harmonious, spend a comfortable rainy season
and not go short of almsfood?’ ”

“Then it occurred to these monks: ‘If we should neither address one another
nor converse, but whosover should return first from the village . . . [a
long passage on how the duties are to be performed] . . . by signalling with
his hands, having invited a companion (to help him) by a movement of his
hand; but he should not for such a reason break into speech . . . Then the
monks neither addressed one another nor conversed . . . [same passage
repeated verbatim with tense changes to show that all this had taken place
for the duration of the retreat] . . . did not break into speech.”

[At the end of the three months rains retreat these monks then went to see
the Lord near Savatthi.] “Then the Lord spoke thus to these monks, I hope
that you kept going, I hope that, all together, on friendly terms and
harmonious, you spent a comfortable rainy season and did not go short of
almsfood?’ [The monks replied that things had gone well for them.] “Now,
Truthfinders (sometimes) ask knowing, and knowing (sometimes) do not ask . .
. In two ways, Lords question monks, either: . . . or ‘Shall we lay down a
training rule for disciples?’ Then the Lord spoke thus to these monks: ‘But
in what way, monks, did you, all together, on friendly terms . . . not go
short of almsfood?’ ‘In that connection, did we, Lord, several friends and
associates enter on the rains . . . [all what took place is repeated from
the beginning] . . . but not for such a reason did he break into speech.
Thus did we, Lord, . . . not go short of almsfood.’

“Then the Lord addressed the monks, saying: ‘Indeed, monks, these foolish
men having spent an uncomfortable time pretend to have spent an equally
comfortable time. Indeed, monks, these foolish men having spent communion
like beasts, pretend to have spent an equally comfortable time. Indeed . . .
like sheep, pretend to have spent an equally comfortable time . . . How,
monks, can these these foolish men observe an observance of members of
(other) sects: the practice of silence?’ ”

[Here’s an interesting footnote on the practice of silence, p. 211: “custom
of being dumb (muuga), according to VA. 1073, for three months. Cf. the
monks who sat like dumb swine, (muugasuukaraaa), when they might have
been speaking dhamma,

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